April is School Library Month

I realize every group/organization/cause seems to have their own month.  According to my professional organization, the American Library Association, April is the month to celebrate school libraries.  School libraries are an important aspect of elementary, middle and high schools.  They serve as a quiet location to complete school work, a resource for research and books, and often provide a computer lab for student use (which may be the only computer a student has access to.) 

Sadly, many school libraries are often the first area to be trimmed when budgets are cut.  I am fortunate to work in a district that keeps both secondary school libraries open and staffed five days a week with certified librarians.  The elementary school libraries in the Gibraltar School District are open five days a week and staffed with dedicated media clerks.  I hope with the future cuts that are being discussed at the state level that Gibraltar is able to keep their wonderful school library media program.  I also hope other districts realize the importance of a strong school library program and keep their libraries open and staffed professionally.  I am really puzzled with the current status of education funding.  At a time when we are calling for tougher standards and longing for success for our students, we continue to cut funding for public education.

I hope to quickly find an April Read of the Month, and will write about it early next week.  I am also playing with changing the template for The Geekly Reader (as you can see as you read).  Blogger has introduced some new features and templates, and I just want to see what I can do to make The Geekly Reader a better blog for you, the reader.

Comments

  1. The new layout is nice!

    For your April read, do you ever read graphic novels? I don't, really, but a friend recently recommended Daytripper by Gabriel Ba and Fabio Moon and I read it this weekend in only a few hours.

    It's just gorgeous. The book is set in Brazil and about a man named Brás. Every chapter is a day in his life, and at the end of each day, he dies. It examines what would've happened if he'd died at eleven, at 28, 45, etc. It's a lovely and thoughtful meditation on when life really starts, and what death can mean.

    Best,
    Meg

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  2. Hey Meg,
    Do you count the Diary of a Wimpy Kid books as graphic novels? If so, I've browsed through those. I just wrote about picking up John Green's Looking for Alaska. I'm going to give that a try, but will keep your title in mind. I'm a visual type so I should enjoy graphic novels. Thanks for the input!
    Mike

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  3. I don't think I've ever looked at Diary of a Wimpy Kid, but I just went to amazon to check one out. I'm not sure whether it would count as a graphic novel, or a novel that happens to have illustrations. The author of Wimpy Kid seems to use illustrations differently from how the authors of, say, Maus and Persepolis use them. I'm not really sure I can articulate what the difference is, but I'll be thinking about it. Interesting question! :-)

    Best,
    Meg

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  4. I'm going to order Daytripper today, sounds really interesting. While I'm waiting I started a new book. I'll use Daytripper for June!

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