Smart Phones....Killing Phone Communication?

If you are reading this blog I am going to assume that more than likely you own a smartphone (except for my top editor in chief my mom).  Now, think about your daily use of your smart phone.....do you use it for to make numerous voice calls?  When I think of my daily smartphone usage I would rank usage as follows:

  1. Social-media use (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram mainly)
  2. Communication via text message
  3. Information consumption via browser or app
  4. Communication via email
  5. Music
  6. Games
  7. Communication via voice
  8. Camera 

If possible, I really try to make all communication via text.  When I think about my daily phone use it is usually just my wife calling or me using my phone to order dinner.  In an odd twist, I really think the advance of the smartphone has actually gone a long way to killing phone communication.  Remember when cell plans used to focus on how many voice call minutes were provided?  People used to wait until after 9 p.m. or the weekends to make all of their calls for the "free minutes."  Now it is all unlimited and the plans revolve totally on data usage.

Only Want to Make Phone Calls?  Good, That is all This Does!

Over at The Huffington Post author Rainbow Rowell writes an interesting piece on the lost art of telephone communication.  If Rowell's name sounds familiar it is because she was the author of my July 2013 Read of the Month Eleanor and Park (which I really enjoyed).  Rowell does comment on all of the new methods of communication but she also points out that cell phone calls are terrible compared to a land-line call.  With all of the improvements with smartphones, they are still average at best for voice communication.  I am never asked to repeat myself when using a landline, but once I am on my cell I find myself repeating things three times.  I guess that is why I prefer texting whenever I have my cell.

I really have no problem with the lost art of the long phone call.  I was never one for hour long phone conversations.  I actually love all of the options my smartphone offers.  I also feel I can carry on a conversation via phone or in person, so I am not worried about losing that "skill."  I do find it ironic that the creation of the smartphone is helping kill the actual phone call. What do you think of Rowell's piece?  What about your own smartphone?  How would you rank your usage?  Do you avoid phone calls and opt for other forms of communication?


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